Louisville Premises Liability Lawsuit Filed Over Kentucky Stairwell Collapse

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Louisville Premises Liability Lawsuit Filed Over Kentucky Stairwell Collapse

In Jefferson Circuit Court, two people who got hurt when a stairway in a Louisville building collapsed are suing the owners of the century-old building for Kentucky premises liability. The Louisville personal injury accident occurred on March 3 when Alan DeLisle and Pattie Clare took a tour of the Fort Nelson property with owners Paul and Carolan Bariteaus. DeLisle oversees Louisville’s downtown development and Clare is his chief deputy.

The stairwell fell two stories, and Paul Bariteau, Clare, and DeLisle became trapped beneath the debris. Carolan was able to arrive at the 3rd floor before the stairway dropped out. She was rescued by firefighters.

According to the Louisville premises liability lawsuit, the Bariteaus should have been aware the structure was not safe, should have maintained the building, should have repaired any hazardous conditions, and should have warned the victims of possible hazards. The two metro workers are seeking a jury trial and compensatory damages. Their lawsuit also names Forte Development Inc. as one of the Louisville premises liability defendants.

According to a spokesperson for Louisville Mayor Jerry Abramson, no city inspectors have been to the building over the last five years because no work occurred on the premise that warranted a safety inspection. The building was constructed in the 1880’s. Paul Bariteau purchased the building over 10 years ago.

If you were injured on another person’s property, you may be entitled to Kentucky personal injury compensation. Examples of some common kinds of premises liability cases, include:

Slip/Trip and Fall Accidents: Slipping, tripping, or falling on the ground because there was an unsafe condition that caused the accident. This can result in painful, debilitating injuries, such as head injuries, neck injuries, back injuries, and hip injuries.

Inadequate Security: A person becomes a victim of a violent crime because there wasn’t enough security or lighting on the property that could have prevented the incident from happening.

Defective Conditions: A person is hurt because of a defect on the property or a defective product on the premise that the property owner could have and should have removed or repaired but failed to do so.

Inadequate Maintenance: A property owner fails to repair an existing hazard on a premise and/or fails to warn patrons or visitors about the danger.

Related Web Resources:
Metro employees sue over stairwell collapse, Courier-Journal, April 14, 2009

Premises Liability Overview, Justia